Greek-Canadian Captures Impressive ”Ice Tsunami” in Niagara River

A Greek-Canadian man named George Kourounis managed to record on camera a rare weather phenomenon resembling a tsunami in Ontario, Canada this past weekend.

Due to the very low temperatures that were recorded in the area, a large number of rivers and lakes were partially or entirely frozen.

Kourounis began recording when he saw the impressive scenes of huge chunks of ice being thrown onshore next to the road which winds along Lake Erie.

Strong winds with gusts of up to 74 miles per hour (119 KM per hour), which is one mile an hour less than hurricane-force, created high waves on the lake. The force of the waves then threw massive quantities of ice floes right onto streets.

Even the back decks and patios of homes along the shore weren’t safe, as the ice piled up in huge mounds.

These “ice tsunamis” are created when to a combination of factors, such us low temperatures, strong winds and currents inside the lake, combine. Despite near-Arctic temperatures in the area, the Great Lakes never freeze over entirely because of the tremendous winds which sweep over them in the winter.

This leads to chunks of ice which have formed around the edges of the lakes being blown around and forming dangerous masses when winds reach gale force.

Lake Erie is the fourth-largest lake of the five Great Lakes in North America, and the eleventh-largest globally in terms of surface area.

The local authorities have now closed the area around Niagara River Parkway, to protect workers, residents and visitors from any danger.